Bell Let’s Talk Day is Wednesday, January 29

On Bell Let’s Talk Day, Bell will donate more towards mental health initiatives in Canada by contributing 5¢ for every applicable text, call, tweet, social media video view and use of our Facebook frame or Snapchat filter.

Help create positive change

When it comes to mental health, every action counts.

Bell Let’s Talk Day 2020: Advocating
Bell Let’s Talk Day 2020: Caring
Bell Let’s Talk Day 2020: Talking
Driving
Networks
Support

5 simple ways to end the stigma and start a conversation

Stigma can often prevent those struggling with a mental illness from seeking the help they need. Developed in partnership with Dr. Heather Stuart, the Bell Canada Mental Health and Anti-stigma Research Chair at Queen's University, here are 5 simple ways to help end the stigma and initiate a conversation.

Your words matter

The words you use can make all the difference. Words can help, but they can also hurt. What would you choose?

  • Schizo
  • Crazy
  • Person with schizophrenia
  • Person with a mental illness

Did you know?

When it comes to mental illness, education is key. Having the right tools, knowing the right words to use and understanding how to correctly speak with someone experiencing a mental illness can make all the difference. View the Bell Let’s Talk Toolkit

Kindness is key

Simple kindness can make a world of a difference. Whether it be a smile, being a good listener or an invitation for a chat over coffee, these simple acts of kindness can help open up the conversation and let someone know you’re there for them.

Expressions like “You’ll get over it” and “Just relax” can hurt more than help. Instead, offer your support and say “I’m sorry you aren’t feeling well” or better yet, ask what you can do to help.

Your presence is all it takes

Mental illness is a very common form of human pain and suffering. Being a good listener and asking how you can help or simply just being there for people you care about can be the first step to recovery.

Here are a few examples of what to ask:

  • I’m sorry you aren’t feeling well.
  • I’ve noticed you’ve been down lately. Is everything OK?
  • How can I help?

Break the silence

Two out of three people suffer in silence, fearing judgement and rejection. Being open to a conversation is the first step towards eliminating the stigma.

Know the facts, be kind, be a good listener and a friend. Be part of the conversation to eliminate the stigma once and for all.

The Right Here, Right Now drop-in counselling program has helped 460 women, a 37% increase from the previous year thanks, in part, to a donation of $25,000 from Bell Let's Talk. Funding has allowed us to be responsive to the needs of women through hiring an essential second part-time counsellor and increasing our evening hours.

Laura Winters, Executive Director, St. John's Status of Women Council / Women's Centre

Kids Help Phone engages in more than 1,500 texting, phone and chat conversations and initiates 4-6 active rescues in communities every day. Bell’s support has been vital to ensuring we are at the forefront of technology.

Katherine Hay, President & CEO, Kids Help Phone

As a result of Bell’s Community Fund grant, we have provided clients living in local, rural and northern outreach locations with 473 urgent psychiatric consultations and have performed 471 crisis assessments.

Anne Sprack, Clinical Manager , Urgent Response and Care Transitions, Health Sciences North

Canadian students making every action count for campus mental health as partners in the 2020 Bell Let's Talk Day campaign

Montréal, Thursday, January 16, 2020

Students at 227 Canadian universities and colleges will be taking action to create positive change in mental health as part of the 10th anniversary Bell Let's Talk Day on January 29. More than 500 campus mental health events are being planned around this year's Bell Let's Talk campaign theme, Mental Health: Every Action Counts.

Read more