Growing the global conversation and supporting Canada’s mental health

The impact of each interaction on Bell Let’s Talk Day has been felt across the nation. Thank you to all those who continue to speak up about mental illness. Let’s keep the conversation going and work together to create a stigma-free Canada.

The 2019 Community Fund will provide grants in the range of $5,000 to $25,000 to projects that improve access to mental health care, supports and services for people in Canada. Click here for more information.

Small action. Big impact.

1,013,915,275

Total number of interactions

+$9

million

in Community Fund grants

534

Community Fund grants

$3.53 million in grants

Children & Youth

$1.5 million in grants

Indigenous communities

$1.6 million in grants

Military family support

Bell Let’s Talk has partnered with more than 900 organizations who have supported over

3,405,103

Canadians with access to mental health services

$100,695,763.75

committed

to mental health initiatives

2,235,043

crisis and distress

line users

1,474,258

children & youth reached

610,148

Canadians supported

through technology-based mental health programs

1,451,375

trained staff and volunteers

15,846

military families helped

through the Bell True Patriot Love Fund

86%

of Canadians reported that they are more aware of mental health issues

since Bell Let’s Talk began

* Infographics representative of 2011-2019

Find out where the funds go

Filter By:

Green Thumb Theatre - BC (Province-wide)

Production of 'People Like Vince', a new theatrical production to fight the stigma of mental illness. This acclaimed theatre company company will travel to 10,000 elementary students in BC.

Community fund British Columbia 2011

McCreary Centre Society - Fraser Valley, BC

Two workshops focused on youth ages 13-19 who have demonstrated mental health challenges.

Community fund British Columbia 2011

The Kettle Friendship Society - Vancouver, BC

Working with our partner Common Threads Co-operative, The Kettle will train primarily women (self selected) in both elementary and advanced industrial sewing skills. These skills will give mental health consumers access to paid employment, either through the Co-operative or in the marketplace. These jobs will lead to increased self-esteem, health benefits due to extra income and added respect from the larger community as they see the success of the women and the products they produce.

Community fund British Columbia 2011