Growing the global conversation and supporting Canada’s mental health

The impact of each interaction on Bell Let’s Talk Day has been felt across the nation. Thank you to all those who continue to speak up about mental illness. Let’s keep the conversation going and work together to create a stigma-free Canada.

The 2018 Community Fund will provide grants in the range of $5,000 to $25,000 to projects that improve access to mental health care, supports and services for people in Canada.

The 2018 Community Fund application window is now open and runs until March 31, 2018. Click here for more information.

Small action. Big impact.

867,449,649

Total number of interactions

+$7

million

in Community Fund grants

414

Community Fund grants

$2.54 million in grants

Children & Youth

$646K in grants

Indigenous communities

$1.25 million in grants

Military family support

740,145

Individuals supported with access to mental health care

$93.4 million

donated

to mental health initiatives

1,051,599

crisis and distress

line callers

492,058

children & youth reached

through Bell Let’s Talk programs

212,260

individuals supported

through technology-based mental health programs

4,265

trained staff and volunteers

3,517

military families helped

through the Bell True Patriot Fund

4 out of 5

Canadians reported that they are more aware of mental health issues

since Bell Let’s Talk began

* Infographics representative of 2011-2018

Rainbow’s End Community Development Corporation - Hamilton, ON

Colours Café, at St. Joseph’s Health Care West 5th Campus, not only offers healthy food options to customers, it also provides fulfilling employment for 15 people living with mental illness and serves as a real-life stigma-defying model every day. To support this work, Bell Let’s Talk funding will buy more and better kitchen equipment to enable the café to offer more variety, plus it will be used to buy coffee-cup sleeves that carry an explicit anti-stigma message, raising awareness and keeping the conversation going.

Community fund Ontario 2014

Refuge des Jeunes de Montréal - Montréal, QC

Bell Let's Talk funding supports adding a new counsellor for the day centre which supplements the Refuge’s evening and overnight work to help young men aged 17 to 25 who are homeless and struggling with mental illness and addictions. With this additional resource, who will also liaise with mental health experts at CHUM, Refuge expects to be able to help an additional 60 people a year (10% more than currently) as it bridges the gap between young people in serious distress and the help they need but in many cases don’t know about.

Community fund Quebec 2014

Royal Inland Hospital Foundation - Kamloops, BC

As part of its JUMP (Jubilee Urban Movement and Partners) initiative, the hospital will use Bell Let’s Talk funding to support the delivery of 100 2-hour workshops over the next year. Led by experts certified in mental health, life-skills training and art therapies, these workshops will give people with depression of all ages a better idea of what options are available for them to resolve socio-economic, health, self-esteem, family and relationship issues that contribute to their chronic and acute depression.

Community fund British Columbia 2014

Second Opinion Society - Whitehorse, YT

The Society is creating a distress phone line to provide crisis support and referral assistance. This line will be available through a toll-free number sponsored by Northwestel, making it accessible throughout the territory and open for calls nightly from 7 p.m. to 3 a.m. Bell Let’s Talk funding will support screening and training of phone line volunteers, including the development of culturally sensitive training materials focused on the demographics of the territory in addition to Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST).

Community fund Territories 2014

Sheena’s Place - Toronto, ON

Sheena's Place offers hope and support to individuals, families and friends affected by eating disorders through a wide range of professionally facilitated support groups and services. With its Bell Let’s Talk funding, the organization will develop a support program for men, an often-neglected sector of the population when it comes to eating disorders. The program will include weekly support groups and body image workshops as well as a targeted social media awareness campaign and proactive outreach to the gay, bisexual and trans communities.

Community fund Ontario 2014

Stepping Stones Support Services - Bothwell, ON

Stepping Stones works to find employment for more than 700 clients who live on social assistance and who, in many cases, live with mental illnesses. Bell Let’s Talk funding will enable them to train their front-line workers to deal more effectively with clients who, in addition to being under-educated and facing substance abuse issues, often have mental illness challenges. This training will ensure that local community staff will be better prepared to look for mental illness issues in their clients and refer them to the appropriate assistance.

Community fund Ontario 2014

Suicide Prevention Community Council of Hamilton - Hamilton, ON

With its Bell Let’s Talk grant, the Council will provide suicide prevention training to 1,500 first responders in the police, paramedic and fire services. These public servants are often the first to face people who may be suicidal. This training will teach the most appropriate actions to take when suicidal behaviors are a concern, to themselves, their colleagues or the people they serve. It includes advice on starting the conversation about suicide with those who are vulnerable and information on local resources they can tap into.

Community fund Ontario 2014

Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre

Bell Let’s Talk and Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre announced a new partnership in support of youth mental health – the $1 million Bell Canada Chair in Adolescent Mood & Anxiety Disorders.

Major gifts Ontario 2014