Growing the global conversation and supporting Canada’s mental health

The impact of each interaction on Bell Let’s Talk Day has been felt across the nation. Thank you to all those who continue to speak up about mental illness. Let’s keep the conversation going and work together to create a stigma-free Canada.

The 2018 Community Fund will provide grants in the range of $5,000 to $25,000 to projects that improve access to mental health care, supports and services for people in Canada. Click here for more information.

Small action. Big impact.

867,449,649

Total number of interactions

+$7

million

in Community Fund grants

414

Community Fund grants

$2.54 million in grants

Children & Youth

$646K in grants

Indigenous communities

$1.25 million in grants

Military family support

1,208,040

Individuals supported with access to mental health care

$93.4 million

donated

to mental health initiatives

1,399,890

crisis and distress

line callers

499,310

children & youth reached

through Bell Let’s Talk programs

334,390

individuals supported

through technology-based mental health programs

851,050

trained staff and volunteers

8,410

military families helped

through the Bell True Patriot Fund

87%

of Canadians reported that they are more aware of mental health issues

since Bell Let’s Talk began

* Infographics representative of 2011-2018

Le Trait d'Union Montérégien - Saint-Hyacinthe, QC

Volunteer recruitment event for organisation's 20th anniversary. The project hopes to reduce the number of people on a waiting list from 48 to a maximum of 15 people, double the number of volunteers and reach 3000 people via conferences and recruitment activities.

Community fund Quebec 2011

Le Traversier, Centre de jour et d'entraide en santé mentale - Trois-Rivières, QC

The project will offer people that hear voices the possibility to participate, on a weekly basis, in a training and support group called 'Living well with my voices'. It's a project that was started in 2007 by the Pavois in Quebec City in collabration with PECH and the University of Laval.

Community fund Quebec 2011

Les Impatients - Granby, QC

The project consists of expanding the Art therapy workshops to Granby (Estrie region) in collaboration with other partners including Suivi intensif dans le milieu (SIM), Val-des-Cerfs School Commission, and the Granby Hospital. The program has seen a lot of success by being able to integrate people with a mental health problem into society and create social economic and cultural links in addition to contributing to removing the stigma around mental health.

Community fund Quebec 2011

London and District Distress Centre - London, ON

The organization needs a new phone system to continue to build capacity of the distress line service with expanding support to the front-line volunteers who listen to individuals who call the distress line. Almost 18,000 calls were received in 2010 and 62% of callers have a diagnosed mental illness or a mental health concern. The majority of callers feel isolated or marginalized by the community, and 4% of calls are suicide related (prevention, intervention or post-vention).

Community fund Ontario 2011

McCreary Centre Society - Fraser Valley, BC

Two workshops focused on youth ages 13-19 who have demonstrated mental health challenges.

Community fund British Columbia 2011

Mental Health & Wellness Division

Mental health training opportunities in Nunavut are limited due to the geographic size and cost of transportation. This project will provide professional development training for frontline mental health and wellness staff to better meet the needs of the region. Some of the project focus areas will include working from a strength-based client-centred practice, motivational interviewing and narrative approaches and developing practice methodologies that will encompass Inuit knowledge, traditions and values.

Community fund Territories 2011

MindCare New Brunswick - NB (Province-wide)

The College will train approximately 6 Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) facilitators so they can teach MHFA to both the college community and the community at large.

Community fund Atlantic 2011

Nipissing First Nation Health Services - Nipissing, ON

The Tree of Life Project is an awareness and support campaign on the issue of suicide that is intended to reduce stigma and improve access to community mental health resources. Information, education and support using both western and Indigenous knowledge on the issues of grief, loss, embracing life, mood disorders, addictions and colonialism as they relate to high rates of suicide for Indigenous people will be the central components to this project.

Community fund Ontario 2011